Archive | June, 2013

Reasons to read The House in the Old Wood, No. 9

17 Jun

You dislike fantasy-genre clichés. The House in the Old Wood has no dragons. No swords. No princes, princesses, kings or queens. Magic in this world is not an “ooh, aah!” thing. It’s an “Oh, yuck!” thing. Karia does indeed embark on a quest of sorts … but she has no idea how she’s going to fulfill it. She doesn’t even know where she’s going. Oh, and there’s a faerie. But I don’t think you’ve encountered a faerie like this one before. Read The House in the Old Wood for a fresh take on fantasy.

What are some of the things you almost expect to find in every fantasy novel?

Reasons to read The House in the Old Wood, No. 8

12 Jun

You want a book that’s a labor of love. I had no illusions as I was writing the series, The Day Magic Died, that it was going to make a ton of money. That’s not why I wrote it. I wrote it because I had to. It was as if the story was in me and had to get out. I got to know the characters, and I enjoyed spending time with them, and I wanted to help others meet them too. Will it ever be a commercial success? I don’t know. I’d like it to be. But that was never the point for me. The point was to tell the story. I am a writer. I write. Read The House in the Old Wood and you’ll be reading a story that had to be told, a book that is a labor of love.

What do you do that expresses who you are?

Reasons to read The House in the Old Wood, No. 7

11 Jun

You’re fascinated with peeking into topics you haven’t had the opportunity to learn a lot about. Karia has to learn to read another language. But did you know that some languages aren’t written using an alphabet? That prefixes and suffixes are not the only ways to modify a word? That there’s more to understanding a language than knowing the words and the grammar? You will after you read The House in the Old Wood, because the twists and turns of languages are among the story’s twists and turns. Or you could read a linguistics textbook. Your choice. Read The House in the Old Wood and you’ll get a fascinating glimpse into linguistics.

Is there anything you don’t know a lot about, but you think would be fascinating to get a glimpse into?

Reasons to read The House in the Old Wood, No. 6

10 Jun

You like people. It’s really easy when you’re writing a fantasy novel to make the setting the star of the story. Or to focus on the plot, or perhaps even some rare artifact with mystical powers (oooh, shiny!). I’m not saying that’s bad; some readers are looking for stories like that. In The House in the Old Wood, I focused on the characters. Reading the book, you’ll meet people you’ll enjoy spending time with. People who have real struggles and emotions, who make mistakes and say the wrong thing and generally are just trying to get along in life, like you are. If you want a story about people, read The House in the Old Wood.

Do you have any favorite characters from books you’ve read?

Reasons to read The House in the Old Wood, Nos. 4 and 5

7 Jun

Just in time for the weekend, a bonus reason …

You like fantasy. The House in the Old Wood will whisk you away to another world, not by telling you tales of fantastical places and amazing stuff, but by getting back to good storytelling. A fascinating storyline. Great characters. A unique setting that doesn’t overwhelm the story and characters. The House in the Old Wood is fantasy the way it’s supposed to be.

You don’t like fantasy. Yep, you read that right. The House in the Old Wood is fantasy. And if you don’t like fantasy, you should read this book. Several people have told me they don’t normally read fantasy, but they enjoyed The House in the Old Wood. One reviewer wrote, “I’m a die-hard mystery reader. … I loved this book.” Read The House in the Old Wood because even if it’s not your usual genre, it’s a good read.

What genre of books do you normally read?

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