Archive | September, 2013

Book 1, Second edition: Other changes

23 Sep

The House in the Old Wood coverThere are several other miscellaneous changes in the second edition of The House in the Old Wood.

Probably the most significant one is the replacement of the word “Zounds.” That word, it turns out, means either God’s hounds or God’s wounds, and is considered by some a curse word. In addition, one of my critical readers pointed out, it just didn’t make sense. There is no “God” per se in these books.

But there is a remnant of worship of the First Ones, so I’ve replaced “Zounds” with words based on references to the First Ones. That continues through the rest of the books, so for those of you who bought the first edition, I’ll share a passage from the second edition that explains things a bit.

Spoiler alert: If you have not read The House in the Old Wood, you will not want to read the rest of this post!

This takes place in Chapter Thirteen, when Karia is hiding under the porch as the adults talk:

“She masters fire,” her mom said.

“Nym’chin!” Avar shouted.

“Avar, watch your language!” Nana scolded. Karia jumped. She had heard the term only once or twice before – it was short for “Nymph on a chain” and was a strong curse word. She never could figure out how that could be a curse word, but then again, there were expressions she used a lot – Nymph’s Wake, Meadowstars and Fires and Ashes – that didn’t make a lot of sense to her either.

She knew how to use them, of course. Meadowstars was a way of saying something was ridiculous; Nym’chin was a much cruder way of saying much the same thing. Nymph’s Wake was something you said when you found yourself in a bad spot. Fire and ashes? she thought. I guess it’s just something you say.

“And keep your voice down,” Nana continued, “or should we just invite Narek, Timbal and Karia to join us?”

The other changes were mostly fixing typos – in part because Word doesn’t like to spellcheck when you have 90,000 words in a document and dozens are in made-up languages and therefore look like misspellings – and adding words I dropped while writing. That’s bad habit I have. I mean, that’s a bad habit I have.

And those two things are why I, and my wife, Julie, and my critical readers, have all been paying a lot closer attention to these things for Karia’s Path and beyond. I’ve even added someone to my critical readers team who is very good at spotting typos.

Book 1, second edition: A change in Chapter 5

22 Sep

Spoiler alert: If you have not read The House in the Old Wood, you will not want to read this post!

I’d better finish telling you what’s different in the second edition of the first book, The House in the Old Wood, before the second book, Karia’s Path, gets here!

In addition to including a map and the first chapter of Karia’s Path, the second edition of The House in the Old Wood has a minor change to the ending of Chapter 5 so you can actually see some Inamali writing. Here is how it reads in the first edition:

Bending down to pick up the quill, her shoulder brushed against the writing stand, nudging it. When she stood again, she saw that on the stand, under the dust, was a piece of paper with some writing on it.

She put the pen back in the inkwell, picked up the paper and blew the dust off.

The writing was Inamali. She recognized the slender, fine characters. And at the top, she saw the only word she could read in Inamali:

“Karia.”

In the second edition, it’s a bit longer and has … well, take a look:

Bending down to pick up the quill, her shoulder brushed against the writing stand, nudging it. When she stood again, she saw that on the stand, under the dust, was a piece of paper with some writing on it.

She put the pen back in the inkwell, picked up the paper and blew the dust off.

The writing was Inamali. She recognized the slender, fine characters. At the top, she saw a familiar word:

Karia

 It was the only word she could read in Inamali:

“Karia.”

Good news, bad news

21 Sep

Inside of Karia's PathOK, it’s supposed to work this way, I know, but …

The good news is that I caught a few problems as I read through the proof copy of Karia’s Path, the second book that tells the story of The Day Magic Died. That means I’ll be able to go back to the text and fix them, and you’ll get a better book when it comes out.

The bad news is that this will delay the release of Karia’s Path. Julie needs to go through the book as well, and then I need to change some things, upload the new text and check it. That’ll only take a few days, but it means the Kindle edition of the book will most likely not be available until the first week of October, with the print version following about five days later.

Sorry to keep you waiting, but I think you’ll agree it’s for a good reason.

Proof is here!

20 Sep

Karia's PathToday I received the proof copy of Karia’s Path, the second book that tells the story of The Day Magic Died.

That was way sooner than I expected it.

So now I need to go through it carefully over the weekend, and if it looks good, I’ll approve it Monday.

Wow, this means … it’s possible the book would be available for Kindle next week …

Back cover of Karia's Path Inside of Karia's Path Map in Karia's Path

A peek ahead

19 Sep

The second edition of The House in the Old Wood (Book One) contains a preview of Karia’s Path (Book Two). It’s the first chapter of Karia’s Path. And here it is for you:

CHAPTER ONE

Dust sprayed into the air, shrouding the young man in a choking haze, when the large horse skidded to a stop. The man pulled the reins to the right, wheeling the horse in a tight circle as he vainly tried to scan the rocks around him. The dust was too thick to make out the weathered carvings. Turning was just stirring up more dust.

He cursed, pulling on the reins without realizing it. The horse reared, and surprise combined with the weight of the bulky pack on his back almost flung him to the ground. He wasn’t sure how he managed to stay in the saddle, but as the horse settled back he patted its neck.

“Steady, Nebok,” he said.

He silently cursed again, and sighed. He was impatient with worry, but there was nothing to do but wait until he could see clearly. He blinked his eyes and coughed. In a few moments it was clear enough that he could tell he had left the trail – again.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: