Tag Archives: The Man with Two Eyes

Four things you may not know about Amazon

26 Nov

I wanted to clarify some things about ebooks and Amazon. And hopefully that’s what this post will do. If things get confusing, blame Amazon for using the same words to mean completely different things …

You can share ebooks

The House in the Old Wood

Share my books — please!

I have mentioned this before, but Amazon has recently enhanced this ability to share ebooks.

If you buy an ebook, or get it free, you can often share it. Just like a regular book. Authors get nothing when you do this, but go ahead and share it anyway. Why? If an author is still trying to build an audience, like me, you’re helping our chances in the long run when you share a book. If an author already has an audience, and by that I mean they’re selling a lot of books, they won’t miss a little revenue. In fact, most authors are not in this for the money (which is a very good thing). They’re in this for the reader. So share away. More information from Amazon.

Some authors and publishers do not opt into this system. That’s fine. I think it’s their loss – and I think it demonstrates what they think of readers – but that’s their right.

By the way, Amazon calls this “Lending for Kindle.” Clearly, they were trying to avoid any confusion whatsoever when they allowed Amazon Prime users to borrow books, and named that the “Kindle Owners Lending Library,” right?

Oh, and the recent enhancement? Now you can share books with another person (and up to four “child accounts”) as part of the Kindle Family Library. (Not to be confused with the Kindle Owners Lending Library, because that’s something completely different, or Lending for Kindle, which, despite the completely different name, is similar. Ugh.) This is better than sharing a book by lending it; under Lending for Kindle you lend a book for 14 days, and during that time you can’t read it. But the Family Library is unlimited. Find out more.

Want an ebook? Get a massive discount

Karia's Path

Get the ebook for less

If you buy the paperback version of a book from Amazon, you can usually get the Kindle version for almost nothing – free to $2.99. It’s called Kindle Matchbook. All of my books are eligible for Kindle Matchbook, at 99 cents. So if you bought a paperback, and then you get a Kindle, say, for Christmas, you can make that switch inexpensively.

Look for the Kindle Matchbook note next the book cover, near the pricing information at the top of an Amazon listing. (I should note here that Kindle Matchbook is a clever name, but it seems odd that Amazon did not use the word “lending” or “library” when they named this feature.)

Authors get paid when you “borrow,” too

The Hall of the Prophetess

Borrow away!

Sort of. There’s a healthy caveat with this one, depending on which service you use to borrow a book.

Remember, authors get nothing when you are loaned a book through Lending for Kindle or Kindle Family Library.

But Kindle owners using Amazon Prime get one “free” borrow every month. (That’s called the Kindle Owners Lending Library. And that’s completely different from the Kindle Family Library, and from Lending for Kindle. Gosh, somebody buy Amazon a thesaurus, please.) If you use KOLL for one of my books, I get paid when you download it.

And if you’re using Kindle Unlimited, you get unlimited downloads. Since people could, in theory, download thousands of books, Amazon doesn’t pay authors on download. It pays when people have read 10 percent of the book. So under Kindle Unlimited, authors get paid when you actually start reading the book. (Why they didn’t name it the Kindle Unlimited Library, I don’t know.)

What my “sort of” does not mean is that authors get “sort of” paid. If a Kindle book price is reasonable, the amount authors get from each sale is not far off what they receive for each “borrow.” When Kindle Unlimited resulted in a massive increase in “borrows,” Amazon put more – and then more – money into the pot that authors split for borrows.

You can follow authors

The Dwarf's Legacy

Get notified about what comes next!

Here’s an easy way to be certain you don’t miss out when an author releases a new book. And it has nothing to do with lending or libraries.

  1. Go to their Amazon Author page. Not all authors have one, but if they do, there are at least two ways to get to it. One way is to go to the Amazon listing for one of their books and “hover” your mouse over it. If they have an Author page, you’ll see a popup (eventually) that says, among other things, “Visit Amazon’s [Author Name] page.” Click on that. Or search for their name on Amazon. Usually the second result will be their author page.
  2. Look on the left, just below their photo. There should be a yellow bar that says, “Add Favorite.” Click on it. Now you’ll be notified if they release another book.

With The White-Silver House and The Man with Two Eyes on the way, you may want to do that at my Amazon Author page.

 

Watch out for The Man with Two Eyes

20 Nov

the-man-with-two-eyes-kindle-coverThe Man with Two Eyes is the barely awaited sequel to my immensely unpopular science fiction/Western/paranormal/romance/hard-boiled detective humor book, The sort-of Murder of Fiona Galloway. If the demand for this second book is anything like the first, it’s sure to end up as a doorstop.

I’ve completed the first draft of The Man with Two Eyes. While I await feedback from my critical readers on The White-Silver House, I’m working back through to create the second draft. So here, to whet the appetites of the three people who’ve read the first Nascent Payne mystery, is the first chapter of the second one, The Man with Two Eyes …

Chapter One:

Nascent Payne sat at a little table near the back corner. In the dim light cast by the fireplace and the single candle perched on the bright red gingham tablecloth, his knees glinted from beneath his kilt. His sleeveless “highlander” style shirt was open, revealing a shock of jet-black chest hair and a tantalizing hint of his rippling pectoral muscles.

Fiona sighed when his tattooed biceps bulged as lifted a glass of white wine to his manly, muscular lips.

Payne rolled his eyes.

“Fiona,” he said quietly, “knock it off!” He would have added that pectoral muscles don’t ripple, but didn’t want to say that much just now, just here.

He had to glance down to assure himself he was still wearing khaki pants and olive shirt, as always. Then he tried to refocus on the case. It was supremely distracting when the victim of his last murder case, Fiona Galloway, got into his head.

She was dead, sort of. Through some weird set of circumstances on Hillsdale, her consciousness lived on. Payne thought of her as a ghost, but his mechanic, Robin Flynn, insisted it was science. To prove it, he even rigged up a little device that allowed Fiona to go with them when they left Hillsdale.

And then he’d cobbled together a portable version so she could go anywhere with Payne. This did not sound like a good idea to Payne, but Flynn pointed out that it could be useful to have a companion along that no one else could see. So here he was, on a case, and here she was too. With her romance-novel-inspired thoughts leaking into his head.

He took a sip of his water and set the glass down. He scanned the room again, and tried to look like an ordinary guy waiting for a friend, and not like a private investigator waiting for a murderer while a murder victim’s fantasies played out in his head. Whatever that looked like.

Payne would’ve preferred to do this in a place with a little more light, but he knew this was the kind of place he’d find the man he was looking for. Low-ceilinged, dim and a bit dingy. Frequented by men and women desperate for something, anything, to take them away from their dull, numb, hopeless existence, if only for a short time. And popular with the women and men who serviced them. Cheap liquor, cheap company.

These were the type of women his suspect stalked. Though Payne couldn’t figure out why he killed Helena. It didn’t fit what he’d pieced together about the man, or about Helena. Maybe that was why he was so intent on finding him. It sure wasn’t because the Colonel asked him to.

He settled back to wait. He’d find him. Maybe not tonight, maybe not here. But he’d find the killer.

The man with two eyes.

Want to read the first book? Get it here.

A side trip into space

23 Aug

And now here’s something for people who liked my Nascent Payne mystery, The sort-of Murder of Fiona Galloway …

My original writing plan had me finishing up the first Nascent Payne series – The Hunt for the Wallaby – about the same time as I finished my fantasy series, The Day Magic Died.

But several things changed that. I decided to devote more energy to The Day Magic Died. Partially as a result of that, and perhaps because fantasy has a larger market than science fiction/Western/paranormal/romance/hardboiled-detective/humor fiction, and maybe because it’s a very different series, more people gravitated toward The Day Magic Died.

This led me to put even more effort into that series, and the more effort I took to ensure that I was putting out the quality I wanted to, the more time those took.

All this amounted to less time available for the second and third Nascent Payne mysteries, The Man with Two Eyes and The No-Good Book.

But there was another reason.

I was stalled on The Man with Two Eyes. I had made great progress on The No-Good Book, completing about a quarter of the first draft. But I couldn’t seem to get past about the 10 percent point on The Man with Two Eyes.

Until this past week.

This past week, I completed the first draft of the second Nascent Payne mystery. I already have a big list of things I need to address in the second draft, and more will come up as I go back through it. But completing the first draft is a huge step forward.

That’s also good news for people waiting for The White-Silver House, the fifth and final book of my series, The Day Magic Died. It’s good news because, when I stalled out on revising that book, I didn’t stop writing. So now that I’ve spent a little time away from the manuscript again, I can not only go back to it, but go back to it at full speed.

Which I plan to do tonight and Sunday.

If you haven’t checked out the first Nascent Payne mystery, give it a look.

Progress updates

9 Aug

Yep, updates. I am simultaneously working on three books …

TWSH-coverThe White-Silver House

My revision calls for five or so new chapters to be written, in order to set the story moving in the direction I want it to go. I completed the third of these this morning.

What’s next?

  • Write the other two “redirectional” chapters
  • Work through the book from front to back, insert the new chapters and generally working to keep the tension high and building

Why do I want to keep the tension high and building? This is the final book, the climax of the series. This is where it all comes together. I want you to rush along with Karia to the ending, swept up by the circumstances and situations, duty and responsibility, just as she is.

I want you to enjoy the journey, all the way to the end.

Haven’t read the series? Start here

the-man-with-two-eyes-kindle-coverThe Man with Two Eyes

This is the second Nascent Payne novella, and the second book in the Hunt for the Wallaby series. To tell the truth, I’m fumbling with this a bit. I need to get the storyline straightened out, then try to move right on through this book. Because this needs to be done before I finish …

The No-Good Book

I’m making great progress on this one. Writing this has helped me get my mind off The White-Silver House, so the seeds of that story can germinate, while keeping me writing. I think you’ll enjoy this third Nascent Payne Mystery, and the third book of the Hunt for the Wallaby series. This book also introduces a character I’m thinking of spinning off, Detective Chief Inspector Broderick Lake of the Interstellar Marshals Service. Oh, and an evil, evil mobster by the name of Gero Zikata. With reappearances by two other characters — besides Flynn and Fiona — from the first Nascent Payne novella, The sort-of Murder of Fiona Galloway. I think this book is even better than the first one. So I really have to work on the second book, not just to get it done, but to make sure it’s up to the quality of the first and third books.

This series starts with The sort-of Murder of Fiona Galloway (The Hunt for the Wallaby) (Volume 1).

What’s ahead in 2014

2 Jan

the-man-with-two-eyes-kindle-coverWhat would you think if I told you I already have 11 more books under way?

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess, “Finish The Day Magic Died series first!”

If that was your thought, you need not worry. The final two books in that series are among the first three or four books I plan to complete in 2014.

In fact, the plan for the first half of the year is pretty much set in … well, perhaps dried mud. It’s not really fluid, but it’s not exactly stone either:

February: The Dwarf’s Legacy, book four of The Day Magic Died.

March: The Man with Two Eyes, a Nascent Payne Mystery. This novella (under 30,000 words, compared to about 90,000 words for each of novels in my series) is the second in the series, The Hunt for the Wallaby.

May: The fifth and final book of the series The Day Magic Died. I am now ready to unveil the likely final name for this book: The White Silver House. Oh, and I’ve saved the best for last. This final novel will likely top 120,000 words, or about one-third longer than each of the other books in the series.

June: The third novella in The Hunt for the Wallaby series is due out. That may wrap up the series, or it may go into a fourth book. Not sure yet …

But even if The Hunt for the Wallaby goes into a fourth novella, that leaves the rest of the year as an open book. So what am I going to do?

I’m going to ask you to help me decide. All next week, I’ll be giving you brief synopses of upcoming book ideas, and asking you tell me what you think. This should be fun …

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